Marketing Lessons From My Dog

marketing lessons from my dogCassie Tucker returns today and we are laying out the greatest marketing lessons you are going to find. And I learned them from my dog.

As a dog owner, I am very interested in making sure my four-legged family member is taken care of. Not too long ago, I learned about a dog boarding and daycare company that markets their product in such an amazing way that I am now a customer. Here are seven lessons I have learned from a doggy daycare that business owners can adopt to their marketing.

First, there is value in word of mouth. Happy customers will share with others. Second, it is helpful to have a red velvet rope mentality. If there is a process that needs to be walked through, customers feel like they are part of something special.

Next, crest a story for people to be part of. Give people a narrative to participate in. Fourth, understand what product you offer. You have a core offering, and you have the underlying experience that is at the center of your products. That is what you need to highlight for those who come across your services.

Next, create more services for people to take part in. If you offer extra, there will always be someone who wants to take part in it. Sixth, scarcity, and exclusivity make people feel good about what they have bought. With exclusive offerings, you create a level of urgency that people want to act on. If you go this route, make sure you allow people to put themselves on a waitlist or opt into getting more information as the service or space becomes available.

Last, maintaining the customer experience should take priority over getting new customers. Taking care of existing customers should always take priority over bringing in new customers. If you can spend five dollars to take care of your current client versus spending five dollars to get a new client,  always take care of your current client. Be honest with yourself and understand how much is too much for you to provide a good product. Don’t spread yourself too thin at the expense of your existing clients’ experience.

They may be a dog boarding company, but Dogtown definitely has an edge in marketing a unique experience that instills value and creates long-term clients.

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Jody Maberry